A child's first words

Your baby can read reviews,

1) Can Babies Really Read? What Parents Should Know!

Before birth the brain responds to the musical quality of sound and can respond to a parent’s voice when read to in uteri.  After birth they are ready for hearing sounds, rhymes, rhythms, tones and words and begin to try to make them and communicate for themselves. Bonding with parents by being held while being talked and read to also prepare a child for future language and reading development. Beginning at from six to twelve months parents can label some common objects in baby’s room and play “reading around the room”. Babies can learn to recognize and read words and phrases attached to their meaning (i.e. bed, toes, red, and arms up). This is as effective and much more authentic than other baby can read methods, states author J. Richard Gentry, and is free.  For more information, see

My-First-Words-for-A-to-Z_1This series is designed for the 3 to 5 year age group and needs an adult or older sibling to sound out the word, read each of the mini stories and share the fun illustration. Listening to the spoken word is the first step to Reading Readiness and needs to be a fun experience. There are two words for each letter in the alphabet.  Some are simple like Ball, Dog and Cat. Some are difficult like Alligator and Xylophone. Some will even be learning opportunities for parents, such as the word Xat.

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2) Exploring Books with Babies

Author Susan Strach  makes a strong case that building your child’s language skills during everyday interactions puts your baby on the best path to reading readiness and using books and reading materials found in your home or the public library are all the materials you need. Babies use all their senses to take in a book initially and should be allowed to hold, handle, smell, taste, see and explore a book. Read enthusiastically and display the art. Most important of all, be prepared to read the same book over and over and over. For more information, see

My-First-Words-for-A-to-Z_1This series is designed for the 3 to 5 year age group and needs an adult or older sibling to sound out the word, read each of the mini stories and share the fun illustration. Listening to the spoken word is the first step to Reading Readiness and needs to be a fun experience. There are two words for each letter in the alphabet.  Some are simple like Ball, Dog and Cat. Some are difficult like Alligator and Xylophone. Some will even be learning opportunities for parents, such as the word Xat.

Click here to get your copy of our Kindle Book,

 

3) Can Your Baby Really Learn to Read?

The Hanen Centre in Canada did a survey of Your Baby Can Read reviews and states that NBC Today found ten different experts who all said the same thing: toddlers’ and infants’ brains are simply not developmentally ready to learn to read at the ability level claimed by the company’s ads. Furthermore, a study done by the University of Virginia strongly supports naturally occurring play activities and routines to encourage the development of language and literary skills.  For more information, see

4) Reading to Your Baby

The Baby Center has received mixed feedback from parents on their results using Dr. Titzer’s program. Though some Your Baby Can Read reviews are positive and parents are excited by the results they are achieving with their youngsters, others are concerned that they may be pushing their toddlers to do things for which they are not developmentally ready. They are uncomfortable with the amount of time required with the television and DVDs. Information from the American Academy of Pediatrics supports their concerns. Pediatricians strongly advice extremely limited television viewing under the age of three.  Cuddling and bonding, associating books with fun, building an interest in vocalization and sounds plus exposure to a wide vocabulary words would be a better use of time. For more information, see

5) Infant Intelligentsia: Can Babies Learn to Read? And Should They?

Infants and toddlers are innately motivated by the desire to communicate and to understand the world around them. Young children can acquire beginning reading skills naturally when they are immersed in an environment that presents them with both written and spoken words often and simultaneously.  For more information, see

6) Your Baby Can Read — Not!

The Your Baby Can Read program is supposedly backed by scientific knowledge from several studies. The information is correct on the way a baby’s brain develops. There are many claims about the window of opportunity a child has to learn how to read closing by a certain age. While it is true that human brains are pre programmed to absorb primary language skills by a certain age, reading is not an intrinsic skill but a learned one. It is a cultural adaptation and can be taught at other ages as well. For more information, see

7) Pros and Cons of Infant Reading Program

Dr. Titzer’s infant reading program may work for many parents and children, but it requires a surprising level of involvement on the parents’ part. Parents who are pleased with the results like the multisensory approach and interacting with their child. The reported drawbacks are the expense, the risk of boredom for the child, the disappointing quality of the materials and the conflicting opinions among experts about the program’s value. For more information, see

8) Recognizing Words by Sight and Memory is Not Reading

Learning a series of sight words has value but many other skills are also necessary to be a true reader. Readers above all are on a search for meaning by using their knowledge of language, sounds, context and other skills to understand the written words. Babies and toddlers can memorize and recognize words and read them as sight words but true comprehension has not yet developed. Professor Cairney of the University of New South Wales asks parents to consider the question: is this the best use of your limited time with your child? For more information, see

9) Early Childhood Sites with Tips for Parents on Literacy Development

Educator Jennifer Ashley refers parents away from programs such as Your Child Can Read and to the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and www.zerotothree.com  for ideas on more appropriate activities for use with very young children for developing literacy skills. She cautions parents to consider that just because infants can learn to recognize words on flash cards does not necessarily mean they should. For more information, see

10) Class Action Lawsuit Claims False Advertising

The Your Baby Can Read program marketing materials claim that children who successfully use the program will be as much as five years ahead of their grade level in reading and that it could even prevent learning disabilities such as dyslexia. It also states that its claims are supported by the conclusions of various scientific studies. Both New York University and Harvard have shown that no such studies exist and the claims are without merit or scientific evidence. Scambook states that bogus claims were indeed used to market this program. Though the company is now out of business, the class action suit continues. Contact scambook to file a report if you feel that you were affected by this. For more information, see

 

Kindle Book Offer for the 3 to 5 year old

My First Words for A to Z, a child’s first words Volume 1

My-First-Words-for-A-to-Z_1aWelcome to our new Kindle book series called, “My First Words for A to Z.” Each of these Kindle books is about helping your child learn new words. The main goal is to make learning new words fun. Each word is formatted with a mini story and fun illustration.

Children generally enter the reading readiness stage through their exposure to their environment, usually by listening to other people talk. This is a critical stage for the child because in order to learn how to read the written word, he/she must first learn how to understand the spoken word.  This is the basis of My First Words for A to Z.

This series is designed for the 3 to 5 year age group and needs an adult or older sibling to sound out the word, read each of the mini stories and share the fun illustration. Listening to the spoken word is the first step to Reading Readiness and needs to be a fun experience. There are two words for each letter in the alphabet.  Some are simple like Ball, Dog and Cat. Some are difficult like Alligator and Xylophone. Some will even be learning opportunities for parents, such as the word Xat.

Click here to get your copy of our Kindle Book,

 

 

 

 

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